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Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Transferring Needlework Pattern to Tape Loom



I found some wonderful Latvian embroidery patterns on Pinterest.  I love Pinterest. We can share photos of each others works, projects and interests.
 

I transferred this pattern I am calling simply Snowflake, Birds and a Heart. With the simple way of pick-up patterns on the Tape Loom, we can combine different design features to create beautiful one-of-a-kind gifts.

The book mark above is about 12 inches long, including the fill-ins and tassels. The pattern below measures out to 7 inches long x 5/8 inches (without the borders). I used 8/2 cotton thread, much like standard crochet cotton.




Above is the original Latvian pattern set for embroidery squares (do not follow this as your draft).  I had to test it out a couple of times, as the blocks for embroidery do not translate perfectly to a weaving draft.  The pattern threads in pick-up weaving are such, that I had to change the pattern to fit into a weave.



Here is the pattern draft to follow. This pattern uses 13 pattern threads plus borders of your choosing. Be sure to start on the bottom row shown on the right, and that you start your first row with 7 pattern threads up.

UP-DATE:  This is European (Baltic) style of weaving bands, not South American (Pebble). Thanks for the comment for me to clarify this.

Need any help or further explanations? Post your comments or check out my book on Amazon, Tape Loom Weaving, simplified.... and have fun!

Sign up for this blog for upcoming pattern transfers and visit my web site for class information and where I will be demonstrating, selling looms and sharing my weaving with all at.. www.eastknollpottery.com

2 comments:

Unknown said...

This is epic! Thanks for sharing! I assume the loom is warped for the European (Baltic) Method and not the South American (Pebble Weave) Method. You don't mention it. Would you clarify the threading method for those who might want to know? Thanks again! Happy Weaving!

Reggina Delarm said...

Yes, this is the Baltic Method. And as aboved mentioned, there are 13 pattern threads!

Thanks!